1/18/2010                                                                                       View Comments

Jesus the False Prophet

By WizenedSage

Christ at the Second ComingImage by Sacred Destinations via Flickr

Christians are fond of defending the claim of Jesus’ divinity by pointing out the “fulfilled” prophesies of the Bible. However, if they paid attention to the whole Bible, then they would see that they are obviously guilty of the confirmation bias; that is, they count the apparent hits and ignore the misses. Below are a number of passages from the Bible where Jesus or one of his minions (on Jesus’ behalf) prophesies that the end of the world will be soon. That was 2,000 years ago. Now, for those who might be tempted to suggest that a couple thousand years could be like a couple days to a god, please be aware that that is irrelevant. The Bible was written for the instruction of humans and no human would interpret 2,000 years as ‘soon.’

Please observe:
Matt 10:23: [Jesus said to his disciples] 'When they persecute you in one town, flee to the next; for truly, I say to you, you will not have gone through all the towns of Israel, before the Son of man comes'.

Mark 13:30: [After detailing events up to the end of the world, Jesus says] 'Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away before all these things take place'.

1 Thess 4:15: We who are alive, who are left until the coming of the Lord [“ are left” for 2,000 years?].

1 Cor 7:29: The appointed time has grown very short; from now on, let those who have wives live as though they had none [he certainly didn’t mean live that way for 2,000 years].

Hebrews 1:2: In these last days he has spoken to us by a Son.

1 Peter 1:20: He [Christ] was destined before the foundation of the world but was made manifest at the end of the times.

Rev 22:20: [Jesus said] 'Surely I am coming soon'.

1 Peter 4:7: The end of all things is at hand.
If the believers are aware that Jesus was wrong over and over about the “imminent” end of the world, why do they still accept him as a prophet?
Not convinced yet? Well, here are a dozen more: Mark 9:1, Mark 14:62, Rom 13:12, 1 Cor 7:31, Phil 4:5, 1 Matt 16:28, Hebews 10:37, James 5:8, 1 John 2:18, Rev 1:1, Rev 3:11, Rev 22:6.

That’s 20 misses. And, in upholding Jesus as a prophet, aren’t they ignoring Deuteronomy 18:21-22?
“You may say to yourselves, ‘How can we know when a message has not been spoken by the LORD?’ If what a prophet proclaims in the name of the LORD does not take place or come true, that is a message the LORD has not spoken.”

Doesn’t this pretty much prove that Jesus was a false prophet, since what he said did not come true – at least 20 times over?

Now think of the “Left Behind” novels authors and all the televangelists and other preachers who are still carping about the imminent rapture and ‘end times.’ I can’t help but see that picture of the three monkeys in my mind; hands over mouth, hands over ears, hands over eyes. Willful ignorance personified.

Think about it. If someone gave you stock tips or horse racing picks a half-dozen or so times, and they were always wrong, would you continue to listen to his tips another dozen times or more? Would you still expect wisdom from this guy? Wouldn’t that be a pretty good definition of “gullible?”

If the believers are aware that Jesus was wrong over and over about the “imminent” end of the world, why do they still accept him as a prophet? And if they aren’t aware of this, why is that? How could they miss so very many instances of false prophesy? Is this indeed a simple case of willful ignorance?

22 comments:

webmdave said...

As usual WizenedSage you hit it on the head.

webmdave said...

He must need GPS....

webmdave said...

"Yeah, of course it doesn't really say "virgin," it says "young woman," and of course the son was named "Jesus" and not "Immanuel," but everything else about the prophecy fits Jesus to a tee. Anybody could see that.
"


Of course, but which of the millions of young women who conceive and call their sons Jeshua, Joshua, Yeshua or Jesus do you have in mind?

webmdave said...

Strange, is it not, how losing xianity restores moraity?

webmdave said...

I agree, Glebealyth. And really if this was a true prophecy, how hard would it be for God to say, "Hey, Mary, you should name the kid Immanuel." But no, Matthew has to grasp at straws to try to find "prophecies" and make them fit.

And really if you look up Isaiah 7, the sign the LORD is giving is to Ahaz and the verse goes on to say, "He (the son) will eat curds and honey when he knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right. But before the boy knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right, the land of the two kings you dread will be laid waste. The LORD will bring on you and on your people and on the house of your father a time unlike any since Ephraim broke away from Judah—he will bring the king of Assyria."

It has nothing to do with Jesus. And this is like almost all of the "prophecies" in the bible that supposedly identify Jesus. Christians say there are hundreds of them. And most of those hundreds of "prophecies" are of the same quality as this one. They make no sense and there's no reason to apply them to Jesus.

webmdave said...

Ha! I got into a laughing fit on this one! Excellent observation.

webmdave said...

Jesus and the fig tree was not a literal story.

webmdave said...

How about preaching disguised atheism? :)

webmdave said...

Of course, the Jesus story had all happened before, almost an identical story! Virgin birth on 25th December, prophet, miracles, 12 disciples, Easter resurrection, baptism, heaven, immortality. You name it! The Persians were there first, with Mithra. The Romans practiced Mithraism before Th RC Church took all the old stories and ideas for themselves. After making all Pagan religions illegal and punishable by death! In fact, the Vatican was built upon the grounds previously devoted to the worship of Mithra (600 B.C.). The Orthodox Christian hierarchy is nearly identical to the Mithraic version. The RC Church even re-sculpted a statue of baby Mithra in the arms of his virgin mother to look more Roman and used it in their Vatican church!

http://www.near-death.com/experiences/origen048.html

webmdave said...

Wizened sage,what you posted has been the basis of my deconversion starting about five years ago.I learned to ask Christians specific questions about this subject and I have gotten some very stupid and ridiculous answers.They don't WANT to see the truth.If they give in to the facts,then they have to start all over again with all of their thinking.It easier for them to use some mental gymnastics to pound a round scripture in to a square answer.It damn sure can work,but it leaves a mess on the table.

webmdave said...

Yep! ;-)

webmdave said...

Yea, I could do an atheist version of Joel Osteen. Just a lot of feel good motivational speaking. Hmmm, interesting.

webmdave said...

Obviously I don't believe the stoey. But it certianly seems to be a literal story of something the mythical Jesus was supposed to have literally done.

Unless you look at it from the perspective of the entire gosples being written as some kind of purposeful myth. I generally think of the gospel authors as writing what they believe to be fact from oral traditions that got exaggerated.

What is your take on it? Why do you not think it is literal genre?

webmdave said...

Many of the stories in the Bible are a form of midrash and rewritten mythology. You can find a similar motif in the Quran with "Mary", as she shakes a tree in order to get food while in labour. There is also a story about a tree in the Buddha story too. Although not word for word the same, I see them as similar motifs. Also, I see no scientific possibility that someone could curse a tree and it suddenly die, unless it was due to coincidence. The similar motifs alone suggest the stories are set to a particular culture and have no basis in reality, except maybe to teach some sort of lesson to the tribe.

webmdave said...

You make a good point that they are rewritten mythology. I agree. There is the markings of plagiarism all throughout the gospels. It seems to me that the christian interpretation of the text, that is to mean how Christians hold the story, is as literal. However, i did come from a hyper-fundamentalist tradition. So, I my be taking the old AG perspective for granted. I just assume that all Christians hold the stories of Jesus in the Bible to be literal. It is possible liberal christians hold the gospels as some sort of allegorical midrash.

I believe that the gospels, as with most of the bible, are mythical fiction just like zeus and hercules. The question i suppose is what was the pre-constantine interpretation of the gospel? It is possible that the Jesus stories were accepted as myth to teach a certain message to a tribe.

webmdave said...

It is like a little kid fibbing. You recognize the tell tale signs of their dishonesty. But this is a bit more sinister . . . if you ask me.

webmdave said...

Well, all I can say is that liberal Xians within the Episcopal Church view the Bible as stories and many (not all) do not take them literally.

As for the question concerning early Xians, you might want to read Robert Price's thoughts on that, as well as other scholars who have studied/research that time. From my understanding, they did not view them quite so literally, but something to glean a lesson from.

webmdave said...

"It has been fifty and six years since I read the apocalypse and I then considered it merely the ravings of a maniac." Thomas Jefferson--2,000 years of Disbelief by James Haughy

webmdave said...

As people 'left behind' by those 'raptured', we get their cars.

webmdave said...

A great many of the Mithra myths were borrowed by the Xians at Constantines convention 325CE. Hell they 'borrowed' myths from all over the middle east & India in assembling 'the good book' at that time. "Make it to astonish' was Constantines dictum at that august conference. You folks just don't get astonished as they were told.

webmdave said...

WizenedSage,......a great post, and you said so many things that have bothered me about the "end times" prophesies.
1 Peter 4:7 " The end of all things is at hand "....reminds me of Pat Robertson's warnings ( plural ) to us, embarrassingly for him over and over.........but then, maybe not. Is Pat Robertson capable of being embarrassed ? In his case, as in the case of so many morons of his ilk, I sometimes WISH there would be end times, just to whisk them all away from here.

webmdave said...

Yeah, that could be said for it too.